How To Get More Flexible Body 

How to get more flexible body?Some people take it for granted that they can pick the laundry up off the floor without having to kick it in the air like a soccer ball. Worry no more inflexible ones! Solutions are here!

I WANT TO GET MORE FLEXIBLE OVERALL BUT RIGHT NOW I CAN’T TOUCH MY TOES

SOLUTION ONE

Start doing Jefferson Curls 2-3 times a week.

SOLUTION TWO

Stretch your hip flexors with the Diagonal Stretch

SOLUTION THREE

Start Squatting Daily

SOLUTION ONE

Start doing Jefferson Curls 2-3 times a week.

The Jefferson Curl is a Loaded Progressive Stretch that will help you touch your toes. To elaborate on each bolded word, loaded means you will use an external weight, like a light 10lb dumbbell or barbell, to assist you into a deeper range of motion. You may be wondering why a weight is necessary. When you are entering a deep stretch without a weight, your body’s natural response is to contract your muscles as a protective mechanism. This means your body will stop you in a stretch before you reach your true end range of motion. An added external weight will assist in passively pulling you into a greater end range of motion. More importantly, using a weight to get in and out of the Jefferson Curl will strengthen your hamstring muscles, giving you lasting hamstring flexibility. As a beginner, start with a light weight and choose a weight that lets you get in and out of the stretch in a controlled and safe manner.

 

Progressive means that there are various ways to progress in the stretch. One simple way to progress in the Jefferson Curl is to gradually add more weight while maintaining or increasing your end range of motion. Another way to progress is to stay in the end range of motion position for longer. You can also progress by performing the movement with more control and comfort or by varying the tempo.  Or, you can progress by increasing the number of repetitions and sets you do during the week. As a beginner, start with 4 reps of 2-3 sets for 2-3 days a week.

 

How to perform the Jefferson Curl: Standing on the edge of an elevated surface, stand tall with straight knees while holding firmly your weight. Imagining that the vertebras in your spine are like pearls stacked upon each other and initiate the movement by tucking your chin towards your chest. Continue curling your spine one vertebrae at a time while you keep your knees straight. After you can’t curl your spine forward anymore, you exit the movement by reversing it. Start uncurling your spine from your tailbone and let this uncurling travel from the bottom to the top of your spine.

 

 

SOLUTION TWO

Stretch your hip flexors with the Diagonal Stretch

Many of us have tight hip flexors from lots of sitting in our lives. Tight hip flexors make it harder to touch your toes and can lead to tightness in the lower back. One of the best stretches for the hip flexors is the Diagonal Stretch. It’s also a great stretch to balance the previously mentioned Jefferson Curls because the Diagonal Stretch involves arching and twisting your spine while the Jefferson Curls involve curling your spine forwards.

 

How to Perform the Diagonal Stretch: Start by standing upright with your heels touching each other and point your toes to 45 degrees so that there is a 90 degree angle between your two feet. From there, if you want to stretch your right side, bring your right leg backwards in a lunge and lift your right heel up, with your right toes pointing directly at the heel of your left foot. From this lunged position, slightly bend the knees of the front and back leg. Then, place your right hand on your chest. Now that you are in the correct position, you begin the movement by reaching your left hand to touch some part of the back of your right leg by arching and twisting the spine. While you are reaching with your left hand, make sure you’re trying to squeeze your glutes (butt muscles) and push your pelvis forward to get the maximum hip flexor stretch. You progress in the stretch by trying to touch lower parts of the back leg. Beginners will try to touch the hamstrings or the back of the knee. After a few weeks, you should try to touch lower and lower until you reach the end goal of touching your heel. Once you’ve touched your heel, you can continue progressing by straightening the knee of the front leg. As a beginner, start with 5 repetitions on each side for 2 sets, and try to hold the last repetition for 10 seconds. You can do this movement daily.

SOLUTION THREE

Start Squatting Daily

Squatting will help you touch your toes by improving your overall flexibility. The squat is commonly associated as a strength movement performed with weights. But simply sitting in a squat is a deceptively effective way to stretch your tight ankles, calves, hips, and spine.

 

How to Squat: Start by standing with your feet slightly wider than your shoulders with your feet rotated outward slightly in a way that is natural and comfortable for you. Initiate the movement by moving your pelvis back while you bend your knees and soften your hip muscles, as if you’re trying to sit down on a low chair behind you. Continue going down as low as you can. The goal is to be in the squat with both heels touching the floor and your butt slightly elevated above the floor. If your heels lift up, that’s okay. Simply find an object like a yoga block, a book, or even a broomstick, and place it underneath your heels as an elevated support to rest your heels on. As you progress, you can choose an object which elevates your heels less. When you first begin, you may find that your knees are uncomfortable—that’s natural! Don’t stay in a squat too long in the beginning. As a beginner, just a few seconds of squatting throughout the day will eventually build up to 30 seconds, a minute, and so on. Your knees will get stronger, the initial discomfort will cease, and you will gain significant lower body flexibility just from squatting.

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